Pete Mountford

Much of Pete’s mixed media work focuses on the city itself primarily as an anecdote to a lot of the ‘tourist art’ one sees around, by representing elements such as the amazing street patterns, fleeting glimpses of the sea whilst traveling and the emergence of the pylons of the Rampian Wind Farm on the horizon line. This draws our attention to what is a familiar view at first sight but, on closer inspection, doesn‘t quite fit and disrupts the perception of the viewer. Another recent addition is the circular format of the ‘Porthole series‘ complete with industrial fixings on the circumferance of the border.

Artist's Statement
Pete has been practising for over 20 years. Educated at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, Dundee and Montclair State University, NJ, USA. He has exhibited in the UK and USA, through galleries and Art Consultants such as Stables Gallery, A&D Gallery, Thomas Corman Arts (all London) and Westbeth Gallery (New York) and City Without Walls Gallery (Newark, NJ). His work has gone through many phases underpinned by an approach of system, chance and sequence which meant having a defined structure to work within, whilst also being able to apply endless concepts and approaches within such a framework. Examples of this include abstract work (that applies colours to specific numbers (forming spiritual and holistic connections), landscape/urban culture and mapping. He frequently utilises the grid, either within works themselves or as part of multi panel pieces where the narrative and dialogue between each module is engaging. Likewise, by using mixed media through applying contact with a range of implements and on different surfaces , he finds the ongoing “interplay and dialogue exciting as one decision invokes another problem or direction”.
 
Since moving to Brighton in 2014, much of Pete’s work focuses on the city itself primarily as an anecdote to a lot of the ‘tourist art’ one sees around, by representing elements such as the amazing street patterns,fleeting glimpses of the sea whilst traveling and the emergence of the pylons of the Rampian Wind Farm on the horizon line. This draws our attention to what is a familiar view at first sight but, on closer inspection, doesn‘t quite fit and disrupts the perception of the viewer. Another recent addition is the circular format of the ‘Porthole series‘ complete with industrial fixings on the circumferance of the border.